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Why? Who? What's this blog about? It's about MEEEE!

Being a Widow

My experience of dealing with grief as a widow

Astrocytoma

About Jane's brain tumour journey: Astrocytoma.co.uk
 

An Astrocytoma: 6 years in 8 pictures

14 August 2011

So here they are: Jane's MRI scans that show how this all went down. They can no longer find the scans they did first, in 2005 so the first view of the tumour is from 2006, a year after surgery. It is difficult to compare scans exactly as they have been taken by different machines, at different times and with different contrast substances. So when something lights up really bright in the picture, that does not always mean the tumour got a lot worse.


January 2006

Diffuse Astrocytoma MRI January 2006
There is a clear grey area on the left of the front (the MRI is mirrored so the left of the picture is the right of the brain). It is clearly visible that the tumour is diffuse. There are no clearly defined edges. It is not crossing the midline of the brain.

January 2007

Diffuse Astrocytoma MRI January 2007
Although some areas light up more, it is clear the shape & size of the tumour has not changed much since the last scan. Indeed, Jane is still happily living a normal life, forgetting about the tumour, free from any symptoms.  The difference in contrast can sometimes be as simple as it being a different machine (or me not using the exact same slide).

January 2008

Diffuse Astrocytoma MRI January 2008
A year later and the tumour is still roughly the same size. At this point. the doctors were discussing a possible tiny tiny change. However, the change was so small that some said there was no change at all. It is difficult to judge from the scan how big the actual tumour is and what is swollen healthy brain tissue.

October 2008

Diffuse Astrocytoma MRI October 2008
Now things have changed. Jane had been complaining of headaches and double vision. The tumour is clearly larger than previously. It is also obvious there is a lot more swelling and the tumour is pushing against the midline, bending it out of shape. This is called mass-effect. The tumour has invaded the Corpus Calosum and this means it is now inoperable. The swelling of healthy tissue is once again difficult to separate from tumour tissue. Based on this scan, Jane has radiotherapy.

July 2009

Anaplastic Astrocytoma MRI July 2009
After the radiotherapy, the tumour has shrunk a little in size. Unfortunately, as is very clear from the 3 bright spots, the radiotherapy has caused extensive brain necrosis (death of healthy brain tissue) and the bright spots are cysts filled with fluid, where brain used to be. Further more, the centre of the image shows the tumour has crossed the midline and has taken on the appearance of a much more aggressive tumour. It is now no longer a benign tumour but an Anaplastic Astrocytoma Grade III. In short: radiotherapy has not worked and caused brain damage. No cure is possible after this. Chemotherapy is started.

January 2010

Anaplastic Astrocytoma MRI January 2010
After 6 months of chemotherapy, the tumour has shrunk somewhat. It no longer presses on the midline of the brain. There is considerably less mass-effect. The grey area is smaller, although the cysts remain. They will not go away. This is a positive result compared to the previous scan and there is hope that the chemotherapy will continue to contain the tumour.

June 2010

Anaplastic Astrocytoma MRI June 2010
Very little change in the scan. Some slight change in the grey area but I can not tell if this is just because it is a different scan or if this means something. Although Jane's symptoms are getting worse, the scan offers no proof of further progression. Just like there can be a tumour with no symptoms for a long time, it is possible to have symptoms longs before the scan shows any change.

September 2010

Anaplastic Astrocytoma September 2010
2 months later, the story is completely different. The chemotherapy is no longer working. The scan is not as clear as the previous ones but it is obvious that the tumour now stretches much further in to the brain. It has now reached the brain stem and affects both sides of the brain. There is no sure fire way to distinguish between diffuse tumour tissue and brain swelling but it is clear a larger area of the brain is now affected. Jane is admitted to the hospice and large doses of steroids help reduce the swelling. Symptoms improve for a few months.

A final scan is done in January 2011. I don't have that scan (yet) but that scan shows more necrosis and new tumours in different parts of the brain.

So that is what it looks like. A relentless march towards death. It never really got much better, no matter what we tried. Looking at these scans makes me angry, it makes me sad. But it also gives me a strange sense of acceptance. It shows in very clear images that nobody could have done anything.


3 comments:

tammy wheat said...

Thanks for sharing, I know it wasn't easy. I understand the part of trying to find acceptance in that we could do nothing more for the person we loved except what we did.

Anonymous said...

Hugs, Marieke! Anni from Finland

Anonymous said...

I also had a brain tumor. MRI scan showed that it was meningioma.Ive undergone brain surgery on Nov. 28, 2012 and had a biopsy. The result of the biopsy said that it was actually a diffuse astrocytoma. My doctor said that total excision was done to remove the tumor. But in order to monitor my condition, I will undergo MRI scan every 6 months. I will start the first MRI this coming May 2013. At present, I am back to my normal work again, except that sometimes I have the tendency to stutter.

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